Start Writing Today

The only time inspiration comes into play is when you decide you want to be a writer.  From then on you must continuously bring yourself to the keyboard – to write.

Too many writers fail in their pursuit because they believe (incorrectly) that writing must come as a result of inspiration.  But that’s not how writing happens!

True and successful writers are made.  To borrow the cliché you need 1% inspiration and 99% perspiration!  All successful writers know that the words don’t just magically appear.   You need to get to the keyboard and start plugging away.

The formula for writing is very simple:

  1.  Set a routine to write.
  2. Keep the routine.
  3. Use some sessions as a means of “rapid writing” and other sessions purely for editing.  It’s important not to mix the two up as they work via different neural pathways.
  4. Repeat


Using the Right Word – Le Mot Juste!

Painters use paint, house builders use bricks – and writers use WORDS.

Influential French novelist – Gustave Flaubert – would spend days searching for the one right word.  He believed that success to good literary work required the painstaking task of foraging through until le mot juste – popped off the page.  It was no wonder if would take him weeks to write a single page.  This technique greatly limited his output – but there is no question as to the quality of his work.

The Right Word isn’t The Biggest One!

Writers, especially beginners believe that you need to replace every word with an obscure replacement from a handy thesaurus.  In reality, a simple word is sometimes your best bet.

Which sentence sounds best?

  • I crossed the field and kicked the ball to the back of the net.
  • I crossed the field and struck the ball to the back of the net.
  • I crossed the field and propelled the ball to the back of the net.

There really isn’t a right answer.  Choosing the right word isn’t just a matter of context within a sentence.  Sometimes the word must reflect the entire paragraph – or page – or chapter.  For instance, the more uncommon a word is – the less you should reuse a word.  In the above examples, I can get away with using the word “kicked” several times…but using “propelled” would not be advised.


Sometimes the right word is a bad one!  But be cautious not to overuse them.  Doing so will reek of amateurism!


How to Make Your Story Believable

Making your story believable is dependent on your “authoritative voice”.  Convincing the reader must be paramount if you want your novel or short story to succeed.  Here are some key methods great writers use.


Research is key.  Readers are smarter than you think.  They can easily sift out “fake facts”.  On the flip side, injecting some true researched tidbits can gain you respect from your reader.

But a word of caution….you can OVERDO it!  Don’t make your story sound like a Wikipedia article!

Hook The Reader Quickly

Inject tension early in your novel.  Doing so (early) tells the reader that the writer – has an important story to tell.  Starting the story off too immersed into pointless description and expository is a great way to lose your reader.

Keep the Story Going!

The story should keep the plot going.  Think basketball, where the aim of the game is to keep the ball moving and ultimately make the basket.  If all you’re doing is dribbling aimlessly your reader will lose interest.  Every seen should be directed at moving ‘the ball’ to the ultimate goal (plot goal) or subplot.


As a writer, your ultimate goal is keeping the reader engaged.  The techniques above are only a few that are key.


You Can Write a Novel! The Five Essential Rules to a Polished Manuscript

Something I’ve come to learn about the craft of writing a novel is that anyone can do it.  However to do so there are certain RULES that you must abide by.  Break one and you are likely to fall into one of the following scenarios:

  • You’ll hit the Writer’s Block wall
  • You’ll get discouraged and quit, or
  • You may find another way through it

If you fall within the last category consider yourself lucky.  By all means, writing isn’t an exact science but certain principles have proven trustworthy to get writers (both novice and professionals) through the process – from original idea to final polished script.

Some tips – such as creating an outline of the story before you start is certainly advantageous but it isn’t necessarily a magic bullet intended to benefit everyone.  Some writer’s swear by the outline whereas some will disagree claiming it hampers their spontaneity and creativity.

But some rules are dogmatic to the writing process.  Break these and you’re likely to stumble.

RULE #1: Come up with an Idea

Seems simple enough yet many starting writers have a very bleak idea of what their novel is about.  If asked what their novel is about they’ll say something like “It’s about a boy growing up in New York.” Okay, but what’s it about?  Note, I’d like to make a distinction here regarding what the story is about and not necessarily about how much wording you need to use to convey your idea.  If you recall from my last article, a good idea could (and should) be conveyed in as little wording as possible.  But in order for a story to work you need to have conflict.  A problem is what defines a good story.  Without it all you have is a bunch of words and no matter how good a writer you are – you couldn’t keep a reader interested without introducing conflict.

Instead of “It’s about a boy growing up in New York.” try “It’s about a boy in New York running from the law.” or “It’s about a lost boy in New York.”  Suddenly your story gains the interest of the reader.


RULE #2: You Must Write

Seems simple enough but you would be surprised at the sheer numbers of aspiring writers who have a good idea for a story but fail to take the next step of writing it.

To do it effectively you must set aside time (preferably each day) to sit down and write your story.  Without a good writing schedule you will fail.

RULE #3: Don’t Wait for the Muse

When you sit down to write you must hit the ground running!  Inspiration doesn’t come easily.  If you wait for that “good feeling” you’ll just sit staring at your notebook or computer screen.  No, instead you should begin somewhere anywhere.  Start writing and don’t STOP!

Once you have a few good pages – another helpful tip is to go back and edit what you have written.  But don’t dwell there too long.  Immediately you should start a new sentence and write.

RULE #4: Don’t Edit While You Write

By now you should know that you shouldn’t text and drive at the same time.  Your brain can only focus on one thing at a time.  For writing this concept is especially crucial because writing and editing are done via two different brain processes.  You can either go into one mode at a time.  A good analogy is going for a workout at the gym.  For many – myself included – I find it difficult to get off a warm cuddly couch in the middle of winter and drive to the local gym for a workout.  I’ll do anything and everything to avoid it.  But incredibly, once you get to the gym – what happens?  You immediately get into the mood for a workout.  Writing is like that too.  You either decide you’re sitting on a couch watching tv or running laps around the track – and once you commit yourself – you’re committed.

Say to yourself you’re going to write for an hour straight – or half an hour – or for a time that meets your schedule.  Once you begin don’t stop for anything.  Don’t even go back to correct spelling errors.

RULE #5: Edit, Edit, Edit

After you finish the writing exercise you will need to go back and edit.  In fact, you may need to go back many times to polish your manuscript up.  Whereas rules one through four are critical in getting to a manuscript, unless you never plan on submitting your novel to a publisher or agent, editing is the step that will get you to a finished manuscript.

So there you have it.  Follow these 5 simple rules and you WILL have a finished manuscript.

Happy Writings!

What’s Your Story About?

In the movie “The Player” a Hollywood studio executive played by Tim Robbins, takes time to listen to ‘Pitches’ for movies.  He goes from one appointment to the next.  This is in fact very true to the way movies are seeded.  Without a good pitch the executive simply passes.  He or she cannot waste time – time is money!

There is a chance that we will someday be called to ‘pitch’ our story.  And just like the Hollywood executive we need to make the strongest possible impression in the shortest period of time.

Mistakes Often Made

When I ask a new writer to tell me what their story is about often you’ll hear them rambling.

“It’s about a dog that runs away from home only to find that life on the other side isn’t all that’s cracked up to be.  The dog eventually find a friend who is a cat.  They go on this crazy adventure and end up in trouble in the local pound.  Then…”

The story is often convoluted and full of twists and turns.  However, to truly grasp a reader or potential readers interest you need to be capable of describing your story within one or two sentences.

Here are some examples:

The Godfather

  • A war hero returns home to rise to the top of the family mafia empire


  • An orphan manages to escape the evil clutches of her step family and marry a prince


  • An evil robot is sent back in time to thwart a future uprising by killing the mom of the uprising’s leader

Then, of course, once you get the person’s attention you are now free to build on that premise.

I’m back!!


Sometimes it’s best to tear everything down and begin over again!

Hopefully I’ll have this site up and running soon.  I also intend to share some of my own writing.  But of course I intend on repopulating this site with all the amazing tips and writing tools – just as in Version 1!